Posted by & filed under Hacks, Security News.

McAfee recently disclosed the result of five years of investigation of a threat actor that have compromised 72 targeted organizations. While the sheer number and time span of the attacks, not to mention the compromised parties’ identities (for instance, the United Nations was hacked) are enough to raise an eyebrow or two, two paragraphs in the article particularly caught my eye:

What is happening to all this data—by now reaching petabytes as a whole—is still largely an open question. However, if even a fraction of it is used to build better competing products or beat a competitor at a key negotiation (due to having stolen the other team’s playbook), the loss represents a massive economic threat not just to individual companies and industries but to entire countries that face the prospect of decreased economic growth in a suddenly more competitive landscape and the loss of jobs in industries that lose out to unscrupulous competitors in another part of the world, not to mention the national security impact of the loss of sensitive intelligence or defense information.

Yet, the public (and often the industry) understanding of this significant national security threat is largely minimal due to the very limited number of voluntary disclosures by victims of intrusion activity compared to the actual number of compromises that take place. With the goal of raising the level of public awareness today we are publishing the most comprehensive analysis ever revealed of victim profiles from a five year targeted operation by one specific actor—Operation Shady RAT, as I have named it at McAfee (RAT is a common acronym in the industry which stands for Remote Access Tool).

So not only are the attacks happening, but thanks to corporate policy and fear of embarrassment we don’t have enough data and knowledge to effectively combat the threat. This is a dangerous thing. I’ve written about my passion for openness as a part of security before, and I still mean that the only way to combat APTs effectively is to share breach information transparently between organizations.

Dmitri Alperovitch also finishes of with a chilling remark (emphasized by me below) that all the world’s CEOs should read (and preferably think about as well):

Although Shady RAT’s scope and duration may shock those who have not been as intimately involved in the investigations into these targeted espionage operations as we have been, I would like to caution you that what I have described here has been one specific operation conducted by a single actor/group. We know of many other successful targeted intrusions (not counting cybercrime-related ones) that we are called in to investigate almost weekly, which impact other companies and industries. This is a problem of massive scale that affects nearly every industry and sector of the economies of numerous countries, and the only organizations that are exempt from this threat are those that don’t have anything valuable or interesting worth stealing.

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